I love North African and Middle Eastern food; especially Moroccan! The diverse cuisine has so many rich, flavorful dishes. And it’s really easy to find tasty vegetarian, and even vegan, foods.

If you’re headed to Morocco, get there hungry! This is a prime spot for a culinary tour. You don’t even have to pack your passport to get good Moroccan grub. Its national specialties have gotten popular all over the world, so if you’re dying of wanderlust, head to your nearest Moroccan restaurant for some exotic tastes.

Here are the best traditional foods to try in Morocco.

fruit stand

Goat Cheese

Goat cheese is in tons of Moroccan recipes, and it’s amazing. If you’re a big fan of goat cheese, I highly recommend that you find a tasting so you can sample several delicious forms.

Dates

Did you know that there are hundreds of different types of dates? In the US, almost all dates are of the deglet noor variety, which is amazing, but there’s still a wide world full of dates out there that you have to try.

Olives

Morocco is home to a wide assortment of olives. The country is one of the world’s biggest olive oil producers, so it is the perfect spot for sampling all kinds of olive varieties.

Fig

I’m actually allergic to figs, so I can’t enjoy them. But, if you’ve never tried fresh figs, you are in for a very nice surprise. Fig Newtons definitely don’t do justice to how delicious these little guys are!

Almonds

Almonds are the foundation of so many tasty things here, especially orange blossom-flavored almond milk (my favorite!) and Moroccan spiced almonds.

Meats

Morocco is famous for its incredible meats—from beef to chicken to camel. Tourists clamor to try the meats, which are slow cooked in a tagine.

Couscous

Another staple of local dishes is couscous. You’ll find it served with a variety of main dishes, and, in my opinion, it’s always much tastier than rice.

Fried Doughnut

Another French import, beignets are a pastry lover’s dream. They are similar to fritters, and you’ll find them all over the country sprinkled with powdered sugar.

donut

Moroccan Sweets

You’ll find shops full of incredible sweets. Fortunately, a lot of them are bite size, so it’s easy to taste a variety. Of course, you’ll want to grab some shortbread and baklava. My personal faves are almond briouats and pretty much anything doused with orange blossom water.

Moroccan Crepe

One import made better by Moroccan ingenuity is the already-amazing crepe. Called mesamen or musamen, this stuff is pure buttery goodness.

Zaazaa

Made with bananas, apples, kiwis, custard, and random toppings of candies or nuts, this is the ultimate sweet tooth fix.

Ready for a sugar high? Grab a zaazaa!

Tagine

You can’t go to Morocco without trying tagine! In fact, you’ll probably leave hungry if you try to avoid it. This is the quintessential local dish, and you’ll find it everywhere. There are countless varieties, so do some experimenting.

Pastilla (or Bastilla)

You’ll find both savory and sweet versions of this dish. The most traditional form features chicken with almonds, and it’s a common delicacy to serve at weddings.

Moroccan Soup

This stuff is a dream for anybody with special dietary needs. Chickpea based, this incredibly filling soup is almost always vegan and gluten-free.

Meatballs

Kefta (or kofta) is a popular seasoned meatball that is much loved by the locals, and it is one of Morocco’s most popular fast foods.

Spices

The spices of Moroccan cuisine are its crowning glory. You’ll see spice shops all over the place offering ultra fresh cinnamon, cumin, turmeric, and so much more. Experiment with different flavors while you’re there, and then pack some up as souvenirs.

Argan Oil

Morocco is home of the world’s beloved argan oil—this stuff is the holy grain. Drip your bread in it. Drizzle it on couscous and pasta. Pour it on your hair. Massage it into your skin. It doesn’t get any more multipurpose than this.

Mint Tea

Ubiquitous in Morocco, mint tea is more than just a beverage.

It’s seen as a sign of hospitality, and you’ll be offered it regularly.

Since Moroccan tea kettles are usually metal, it’s traditional (and practical) to use handle mitts. They come in a gorgeous array of styles, and they’re a perfect souvenir.

 

Shop my favorite Morocco styles!

 

Kiersten Rich

Kiersten Rich is the bikini-obsessed author of award-winning solo female travel and lifestyle blog, The Blonde Abroad, featuring travel tips, fashion, food, festivals and photography from around the world.

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